7 Simple Stress Busters

7 Simple Stress Busters

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Going from college to high school can seem like a big transition for some students.  The academic workload, increase of responsibility and just the aspect of being on your own for the first time in your life can come as a bit of a shock.  Many students are not prepared and putting all of the new aspects of college life together at one moment can lead to what all people have but dread: stress.

Stress is a common presence in the lives of many Americans, not just college students, and it can arise from a multitude of factors varying for each individual.  College students, however, do face high levels of stress, which can contribute to how successful a student is and their overall college experience. Learning to manage stress can be a key component to a successful college experience. The biggest problem with stress is how to deal with it.  What actions can be taken to relieve and prevent future stress? What do you do if you are stressed?  Well, here are seven simple tips to help relieve and prevent future stress.

1. Allow plenty of time. Do not get involved in too much or spread yourself too thin, as being too busy is a major source of stress.  Allot yourself enough time to complete every task that needs to be accomplished.  Decide which tasks are most important and need to be completed first.

2. Exercise. Exercising or just doing something active, whether it’s yoga, rock climbing or even karate, is a great stress buster.  Exercise improves blood flow to the brain and causes the release of chemicals called endorphins into the bloodstream, which provide feelings of happiness and an overall sense of wellbeing.

3. Get plenty of rest. Sleep is important in the management of stress meaning that getting enough sleep allows time for your mind to refocus, recharge and rebalance.  Sometimes getting in a daily nap or going to bed early one night may be all you need.

4. Talk with a friend or family member. If you are very stressed, talk to someone.  Find someone that you feel comfortable talking to and tell them what is on your mind.  Sometimes getting other peoples perspective or just getting things off your chest in general can make all the difference.

5. Get some quiet time. As in college life, alone time is hard to find. Personal space is rare for students; bathrooms and bedrooms are shared as well as the gym and even the library.  Finding time to yourself is difficult.  However, it is important to find a space where you can go and be alone to escape from the crazy world of college life.  Getting sufficient quiet time in which you can regain thoughts and just relax can work wonders on your stress levels.

6. Make room for fun. It is important to make time for activities that you enjoy doing – the activities that you do for you, for fun.  Everyone has something that they love doing and that makes them happy when doing it, whether its playing a sport, the guitar or even doing volunteer work.  Find something you love and use that as your go-to-activity when you feel stressed.

7. Keep things in perspective. College life may seem overwhelming, as there are many things that you want to do.  Although this is the case, there is only so much a person can handle and the reason why you are in college must not be, but often forgotten, is academics.  No matter what you choose to involve yourself in, the most important priority is always academics.  Nothing else will matter if you do not succeed academically.

Stress, like many things in life, is manageable and how you deal with stress holds much significance.  Following these seven simple tips will help de stress your life, allowing you to lead a more successful and fun college career.

Finally an Excuse to Slack Off

Finally an Excuse to Slack Off

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Every week this semester seems never ending for me. Taking 18 credits, going to practice and helping plan our next Raider Relief project leaves only a little wiggle room to have some fun. One way I try to take advantage of my free time is to just slack off. I am very focused at school, but the slacking off I’m referring to involves some nylon webbing and two trees. Slacklining is a balance sport, which utilizes nylon webbing stretched tight between two anchor points, and is an activity that has rapidly grown in popularity. Maybe you have seen some people by the campus lakes having a slack off, just trying to balance their school work with their social life.

Slacklining began when climbers who were hanging out in campgrounds became bored and started playing with their equipment. Since slacklining’s development in the late 1970s, slacklining has grown into an international craze, and is a common and popular pastime within the outdoor community. Slacklining has become so popular because anyone can do it. Some people do it for fun, while others do it for the obvious athletic benefits, and some still do it for a meditative purpose (seeking a higher state of mind). It’s just a great way to get a little exercise and hangout with friends. There is lowlining (basic slacklining low to the ground), tricklining (people do flips and spins) and highlining (extremists put lines over canyons and rivers). For now, I am going to stick to lowlining.

I encourage people to try slacklining because with it combines an emphasis on focus, balance and strength. For the adventurous, it’s an effective cross-training activity for yoga enthusiasts, surfers, climbers and snowboarders. Also, it’s just as much an exceptional form of exercise as it is a spiritual quest, where your mind and body exist in complete balance with nature. Slacklining presents individuals with the opportunity to truly live in the moment with an emphasis on focus, fulfillment and fun. What are some other ways you like to slack off?