The show is coming, the show is coming!

I’m starting to get so excited; the musical Company is just a week away! We just started putting light cues together last night at rehearsal. It made for an interesting rehearsal. Usually they’re called cue-to-cue rehearsals, because we’re literally acting from light cue to light cue. That means we’re freezing wherever there’s supposed to be … Read more

I’m starting to get so excited; the musical Company is just a week away!

We just started putting light cues together last night at rehearsal. It made for an interesting rehearsal. Usually they’re called cue-to-cue rehearsals, because we’re literally acting from light cue to light cue. That means we’re freezing wherever there’s supposed to be a change in the lights.

It’s really a cool process. I appreciate that our Department of Theatre professors are professional and very good at what they do. It’s because of lights, sounds, staging, and costumes that our shows consistently look fabulous.

The show is really starting to come together too. Everything is memorized and show-ready, and every night we improve things in the show—even when it already seems like we can’t improve much more!

The curtains are hung, the props are all ready. We’re performing with a darkened audience and lights and a pit band. We’re ready.

This is going to be a fabulous show. I can’t stop talking about it to people—which is why I’m blogging about it :)

Seriously, if you want to see one of the coolest musicals Mount Union has put on stage, come see the musical! Plus, it’s the last one ever being performed in Rodman Playhouse! Of course we’re going to go out with a bang!

The show is April 4-6, 11-13 at 7:30 p.m. and April 7 at 2 p.m. To order tickets, call (330) 821-2565.

Music for the show

Let’s talk about the pit band for a minute here. We’ve been working on Company for weeks now, with the vocal music director Ian LeRoy. He’s a junior music performance major, and he’s been doing an excellent job. Come see the show, and you’ll know what I’m talking about. The first thing you’re going to hear … Read more

Let’s talk about the pit band for a minute here.

We’ve been working on Company for weeks now, with the vocal music director Ian LeRoy. He’s a junior music performance major, and he’s been doing an excellent job.

Come see the show, and you’ll know what I’m talking about. The first thing you’re going to hear is an a capella bit that leads to a cluster chord–basically, a lot of notes at the same time. It’ll make you shiver it’s so good.

So acting, check. Vocals, check. What we needed was the band.

And they are sounding pretty incredible. With everything from two pianists, a ‘cello, trumpets, and more, we are gonna have such an amazing sound for this performance.

I think the only relatively difficult thing thus far has been nailing down the times. But now we’re golden.

Here’s some things to listen for, voally and instrumentally:

1. The opening of the show. It’s just jaw-dropping.

2. The girlfriends’ trio. Their voices are gorgeous and complement each other very well.

3. The sax in the opening of The Ladies Who Lunch scene. Junior Ian Bell :)

4. Anything the husbands sing together.

5. The end of Someone is Waiting and Sorry Grateful. Senior Kenny Leep and junior Jesse Phillips are going to make every girl in the room fall in love with them.

6. Another Hundred People by freshman Erin Bell

(PS, have I mentioned that all the other girls in the show besides me are freshmen? Such a talented freshman class, holy wow!)

Just wanted to give you a couple things to look forward to :) Come see the show!

The show is April 4-6, 11-13 at 8 p.m. and Sunday April 7 at 2 p.m. at Rodman Playhouse

Bobby baby

Bobby. Bobby. Bobby baby. The first music rehearsal for Company was last night, and we began to learn the title song of the show. It’s the most difficult song in the show. (This recording starts the song at 6 minutes 50 seconds) The song is trying to simulate the mothering, incessant phone calls of Bobby’s … Read more

Bobby. Bobby. Bobby baby.

The first music rehearsal for Company was last night, and we began to learn the title song of the show. It’s the most difficult song in the show. (This recording starts the song at 6 minutes 50 seconds)

The song is trying to simulate the mothering, incessant phone calls of Bobby’s friends. They are always calling him and wanting to hang out, asking for favors, etc. To illustrate this, there are a lot of times when people are singing over one another, and sometimes people are literally jumping into the song.

It’s AWESOME.

The song is this entire cacophony of sound as the different characters chime in with “Bobbys,” “Bobby Darlings” and invitations to dinners, shows, whatever.

Another thing that’s prominent is a minor third (if you sing the first two notes of the national anthem, you have a minor third, for example).

Cool fact, the minor third is called the “Mother Interval.” For whatever reason, in every culture without fail, the minor third is the first interval an infant hears. Think of how your mom says your name when she’s trying to get your attention—it’s a minor third.

“Bobby” is sung over and over on this interval, and it represents the way Bobby’s friends “mom” him. Sondheim, the composer of Company, is a genius.

The cast of the musical includes 6 men and 8 women, all of whom are extremely talented musicians and actors. This show is seriously gonna be so good.

We’re actually going to do all the notes and all the harmonies. Some of the Broadway cast recordings available have a slightly watered down version of the song.

The song we worked on last night is just one of the many amazing songs in Company. This musical is going to test everyone’s musical ability, and it will be such an intense production.

April 4-6, 11-13 at 8 p.m., and April 7 at 2 p.m. in Rodman Playhouse.

Lose an activity, Gain another

Lose an activity, Gain another

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High school to some people seemed easy. You could be dedicated to so many groups and organizations and it wouldn’t be too much of a burden. If anything, it really kept you motivated and it was usually fun. I was in the band and I played multiple sports, so I was always busy with something. I even auditioned for the musical my senior year and got a back up part … but then I realized that High School Musical is only a movie, and I couldn’t play a sport and be in a musical at the same time.

What I am getting at is that sometimes you are unable to do something you once loved. Athletic training is my major, which means that is my first priority. This alone takes up a great deal of time, which means I have to let go of a few things I love. Playing trombone in the band was tons of fun, but it is something I can’t commit to right now. I’ve played soccer since I was able to run and now I can’t do it anymore simply because I don’t have the time.

I’m not the only one in this position. I have friends from other schools that are unable to play a sport because their bodies are just unable to take the demands of the sport, they didn’t make the team, or their majors just take up all of their free time. Some others aren’t able to be in Student Senate like they once were or they might just not have the heart for that activity they once had.

If you can’t do an activity you once loved, get involved in another. I don’t play multiple sports like I once did and I don’t play for a few hundred people at a halftime show, but I am doing things I never thought I’d even think I would once do. I have two jobs, one as a student ambassador and the other as a student blogger. This is something I never thought I would do, but I am so glad I am doing it.

You need to occupy all the free time you have because the more free time you tend to have, the more time you slack off (usually). The more activities or events you may have going on, the more organized your time will become, and this will help you from feeling useless and sorry for yourself, since you can’t do what you once did.

I still do miss playing trombone with a whole band and I miss playing soccer with friends I have grown up with, but college is the time to open up to new experiences. You have to let go of what you once had and find a new niche that is hidden inside of you somewhere. Everyone is different, so find whatever you know will suit you best.