Steel drums!

Steel drums!

At this very moment, I’m typing my blog to the rhythm of a set of steel drums. They are just the neatest instruments. They look like oil barrels or metal trash cans with the tops dented in, and they make the most delightful metallic percussion sound. The drums were graciously lent to us by the … Read more

At this very moment, I’m typing my blog to the rhythm of a set of steel drums.

They are just the neatest instruments. They look like oil barrels or metal trash cans with the tops dented in, and they make the most delightful metallic percussion sound.

The drums were graciously lent to us by the Canton Symphony Orchestra. We were told that they were going to lend them to someone else, but heard Mount Union was interested and said, “Here you go!”

I think it’s a great opportunity for the percussion students to learn a new and interesting kind of instrument, especially because steel drums aren’t easy to come by.

The steel drums are being used with the jazz band, and their sound combined with trumpets is really cool. The jazz band concert is going to be really awesome this semester!

The jazz band concert is April 24 at 7:30 p.m. in Campus Grounds. This will definitely be a concert you don’t want to miss!

Okay. That, up there, was going to be my blog. Then I decided a few minutes ago, “I think I’ll go take pictures of the steel drums!”

(USUALLY, if a rehearsal hall is open while an ensemble is working, you can pause in the door and listen without bothering anyone. Taking pictures though, no. I just did because…well because I was discreet!)

So I was listening and taking pictures surreptitiously, and I just wanted to reiterate how awesome the steel drums sound. They’re not only working with brass, but a jazz flute and a few other percussion instruments.

Awesome sound, I’m excited, and you should be too.

April 24. Be there.

Andrew

Andrew Whitman, playing steel drums

Group1

(L to R) Brian Archer, Sean Eppler, Jeff Neitzke, Tim Bagnola, Sara Hall

Group2

(L to R) Lizi Glanemann, Jake Husted , Kevin Princic, Heather Rice, Demi Lohr, Thomas Gaskins

Mahler, part 2

Exciting stuff! Mahler was amazing. Mahler Mahler Mahler. As I mentioned in a previous blog, the Mount Union Concert Choir had the opportunity to sing Mahler’s second symphony with the Canton Symphony Orchestra. First of all, the fact that we even had the opportunity to do that was freaking amazing. I can’t say enough good … Read more

Exciting stuff!

Mahler was amazing. Mahler Mahler Mahler.

As I mentioned in a previous blog, the Mount Union Concert Choir had the opportunity to sing Mahler’s second symphony with the Canton Symphony Orchestra.

First of all, the fact that we even had the opportunity to do that was freaking amazing. I can’t say enough good things about our choir program and the things that Dr. Cook has brought with him (this is only his second year as our director).

The Canton chorus really liked us. They could tell that Mount Union students brought a certain level of professionalism and preparedness, and they appreciated our hard work and effort. We were all mixed in with the Canton chorus as far as seating goes, and Dr. Cook heard a lot of comments after the performance about how awesome we were. Go us!

Then there was the performance.

It. Was. Beautiful. Like, I cried. On stage. I’m 99% singing, and 1% trying to figure out a good way to stop snotting up my face. The whole thing was so powerful because Mahler made beautiful music. And, there I was, singing one of the most coveted singing opportunities out there.

And, as if that isn’t awesome enough, Gerhardt Zimmermann blew us a kiss at the end. He’s the director of the Canton Symphony, and he is not an easy man to impress.

But wait, there’s more!

Our performance will be playing on the radio because they recorded it! Tune into 89.7 in January to hear our performance! More details to come on that later, or follow Canton Symphony on Facebook to find out!

This was an awesome opportunity, and it came to fantastic fruition.

Mahler!