A New Year, A New Look

A New Year, A New Look

Winter break is winding down, the new year has been rung in, and we all get to hear the general overhaul of standard resolutions…loose weight, eat healthier, quit smoking, save more money, drink less and so on. I have been thinking about several resolutions for a while and will make a post about some later, … Read more

Winter break is winding down, the new year has been rung in, and we all get to hear the general overhaul of standard resolutions…loose weight, eat healthier, quit smoking, save more money, drink less and so on. I have been thinking about several resolutions for a while and will make a post about some later, but since I have been home I have been nagged by my dad to cut my hair. I had been growing it out for just under 2 years, went abroad with it, adapted to the flow, but upon instinct decided it had to go. I figured that since this coming semester is my last and I will be in a full fledge job hunt, I would be more appealing to employers with a clean cut.

I fell a few inches short of Locks for Love and Wigs for Kids donations, but am making sure some cancer patient or local hospital will accept my hair. The reason I had held off to cutting it off is because I wanted to donate it for a good cause. I won’t let the national non-profits hold me back. I also came to peace with the decision thanks to snowboarder, skateboarder and X-Games gold winner Shaun White. When you think of Shaun White, you immediately think of his long, red locks. His hair defined him. However, he decided to cut and donate his as well, which I found on via YouTube, and made my decision a lot easier!

My brother John, who’s hair is also very long and also tried to help me ignore sales pitches on getting mine cut, had sent me an email a while back about hair and the nervous system. It is a rather interesting article and I hope you read to the end! “Hair is an extension of the nervous system, it can be correctly seen as exteriorized nerves, a type of highly evolved “feelers” or “antennae” that transmit vast amounts of important information to the brainstem, the limbic system, and the neocortex.

Not only does hair in people, including facial hair in men, provide an information highway reaching the brain, hair also emits energy, the electromagnetic energy emitted by the brain into the outer environment.

With the usual enticements, the U.S. Military, enlisted some Indian trackers. Once enlisted, an amazing thing happened. Whatever talents and skills they had possessed on the reservation seemed to mysteriously disappear, as recruit after recruit failed to perform as expected in the field.

Serious causalities and failures of performance led the government to contract expensive testing of these recruits, and this is what was found: When questioned about their failure to perform as expected, the older recruits replied consistently that when they received their required military haircuts, they could no longer ’sense’ the enemy, they could no longer access a ’sixth sense’ , their ’intuition’ no longer was reliable, they couldn’t ’read’ subtle signs as well or access subtle extrasensory information.

Time after time the man with long hair kept making high scores. Time after time, the man with the short hair failed the tests in which he had previously scored high scores.

Here is a typical test: The recruit is sleeping out in the woods. An armed ’enemy’ approaches the sleeping man. The long haired man is awakened out of his sleep by a strong sense of danger and gets away long before the enemy is close, long before any sounds from the approaching enemy are audible. So the document recommended that all Indian trackers be exempt from military haircuts. In fact, it required that trackers keep their hair long.”

Oh well.

(Read the article in full here).

International Culinary Experience Like No Other.

International Culinary Experience Like No Other.

In the late 1980s, Harold Hall, who at that time was serving as director of international recruitment, organized a small gathering for the international students of Mount Union College to get together and enjoy food from the different countries they came from. The students cooked food from their respective countries and brought it to the … Read more

AIS members

In the late 1980s, Harold Hall, who at that time was serving as director of international recruitment, organized a small gathering for the international students of Mount Union College to get together and enjoy food from the different countries they came from. The students cooked food from their respective countries and brought it to the gathering to share with their peers. Each year, due to the increase in international student admissions, the gathering got bigger. Soon, the international students brought guests to the gathering.

Close to 30 years after that first gathering, the International Dinner is now organized by the Association of International Students (AIS). The event is held annually and has been a collaboration between AIS and the University of Mount Union’s food service provider, AVI Foodsystems.

This year’s International Dinner featured three festivals as its theme – Lunar New Year from China, Pongal from India and Day of the Dead from Mexico. Tables were decorated with paper dragons, which were hand-made by AIS members, chalk drawings (done with color pencil this time) and hand-painted mini skulls. The skulls were not as intimidating as I had expected. Being colored so extensively, they actually look… nice.

This year, the food represented countries including Greece, Romania, Thailand and Jamaica.

Greek Salad – Greece (for obvious reasons)

Stuffed Mushrooms – Italy/America

Pad Thai – Thailand (again, for obvious reasons)

Jerk Chicken – Jamaica

Ciorba Soup – Romania

Chocolate Fondue – France/Switzerland

The performances during the dinner were by Mount Union’s very own international students. The night featured singing and dancing and ended with a traditional Japanese dance called “So-Ran Bushi.” The traditional dance was performed by the Japanese students of Mount Union and depicts ocean waves and the tasks of fishermen.

It was a great night and I couldn’t help but feel relieved. Planning this with the other executive board members of AIS was stressful. At the end of the day, it was worth all the time spent. I had the opportunity to meet some great people from the Alliance community and also faculty members.

Now that this is over, I can finally eat, sleep and BREATHE normally again.

Which makes me wonder… what’s next for AIS? Wait and see.

Double Review: The Hunger Games

Double Review: The Hunger Games

Read more

I heard about The Hunger Games from a number of my teammates who were reading the book. I didn’t even know they read books so this instantly convinced me to want to read this specific book. I bought it online and it took longer for it to be delivered than it did for me to read it. I finished the book the night before I saw the movie. The book pretty much took over my life until I finished it. It was hard for me to put it down as I had to figure out what happened next and how it happened.

This book was definitely an original piece but at the same time it reminded me of The Greatest Game, a story about a hunter hunting another hunter. Overall, this book is at a reading level that anyone in the family can enjoy.  I’m no critic, but I am critiquing this book anyways.

I saw the movie expecting it to be not as good as the book (just like any other book that is made into a movie), and I was right. But compared to other books that have been made into movies, this was a very good movie. It was easy to understand for anyone that didn’t read the book. I know a few things were left out from the book, but the movie was still about two-hours long and it didn’t disappoint. I felt anxious while reading the book. During the movie I felt a wider range of emotions, but it wasn’t as intense as the book.

Either way, I enjoyed both and I still have to read the second and third book of The Hunger Games. Once I get the money, I’ll buy them, read them and maybe even review them. If not, I suggest you read all three and let me know how they are.

Spring Semester is Underrated

Spring Semester is Underrated

Read more

Fall semester was easily the hardest semester I’ve been through. It was only my third semester of college, but it was easily the most difficult. OK. I did take a dance class, which made life easier, but all of the other classes were definitely not as easy.

This spring semester seems like a joke to me, compared to last semester at least. I shouldn’t have that mindset though. I should be going into this semester just as hard as I did in the fall so my grades will improve, but I like things to be easy so I am just going to take it lightly. Some of my classes are lower on the workload, but they still matter. After this semester, I will be half way done with college. Basically, I need to take this semester just as seriously as I did the last, or else my grades will be lower than they were last semester.

I am telling myself this so that if my grades are lower at the end of the semester, I deserve to be hit by someone who read this.

It’s a New Year

It’s a New Year

Read more

So it’s 2012 now! The beginning of a new year. The beginning of many other new things. A new semester with new classes and new professors. New events and campus activities. New experiences and opportunities that will come around. New relationships and connections that will be made.

A new year presents many chances for change and endless possibilities. It is, in a way, a chance to start over. Do something different. Make improvements on what was unfavorable from 2011. As 2012 begins, the chance is given to start fresh and better you. It’s the time to make changes in your life. This year is yours and you can choose to do anything with it. Make a goal to do better academically. Spend more time studying. Do volunteer work. Study abroad. Join a new club/organization on campus. Reach an athletic goal. 2012 is a blank canvas that needs filled and it needs some color. So what are you going to do this year?