Getting Back on Track

Hello! In my previous post, I talked about getting the flu and missing the first week of school. Some of you may be wondering how on earth you recover from missing a week of classes so let me elaborate on my experience. First, I checked all of my professor’s syllabi and wrote down in a … Read more

Hello!

In my previous post, I talked about getting the flu and missing the first week of school. Some of you may be wondering how on earth you recover from missing a week of classes so let me elaborate on my experience.

First, I checked all of my professor’s syllabi and wrote down in a calendar what assignments were due when and what they were going over in class on the days I was gone. One of the benefits for me was getting sick in the beginning of the semester so the first days of my classes were mostly going over the syllabus and not really introducing the material yet. After my calendar was filled out, I made a list of physical assignments that were due (not reading, studying or looking over power points). Then, I prioritized the list based on when I had each of the classes the following week. I started the work on Sunday so I could get a few assignments out of the way. Thankfully we had Monday off, which gave me an extra two days to complete the assignments that were due for my four MWF classes. Tuesday I only have one afternoon class so that was another lucky break I got in this situation. For the most part, after dedicating pretty much all my free time to schoolwork, I was caught up by Friday. French is the one class that being absent has greatly affected me. We learned a lot of topics in class when I was out so I missed the opportunity to hear the words being spoken and taught in class. I have not had French before either, so although I’ve made flashcards, I don’t pronounce the words correctly. This is a problem because we have a listening section of the test where I have to write down the French that the teacher speaks. Thankfully we have a student tutor for this class, so tonight I will see her to get help with what I don’t understand before our test on Wednesday. We took a practice test today and I did relatively well so that made me feel a bit more confident. Last week I was also struggling with understanding what went on in my biology class the week I was out so I set up a time to meet with my biology professor on Friday and it helped a lot. I feel all caught up in that class after seeing her.

So if you do end up sick at one point, try not to stress about the make up work too much. Your professors are flexible and understand illness happens. You must seek them out though and make sure to touch base with them in case something that was not on the syllabus happened in class! Hopefully you can avoid my situation though and never get that sick!

Sick Days

Hello all! The beginning of my spring semester did not go as I had planned. The Friday before school started I got very sick. I was at work all day (starting at 11 a.m.) and was feeling off but didn’t think much of it. I had goosebumps and felt nauseous but it was my last … Read more

Hello all!

The beginning of my spring semester did not go as I had planned. The Friday before school started I got very sick. I was at work all day (starting at 11 a.m.) and was feeling off but didn’t think much of it. I had goosebumps and felt nauseous but it was my last shift so I tried to just stick it out. My mom and I were supposed to go to dinner after I got off work and go see a movie together before I left to go back to school. The night before I did the same thing with my dad. My mom was coming before I got off work to take my check to the bank, so I was planning to ask her to pick me up some medicine as well. When she came in she knew I didn’t feel well and said it felt like I was starting to warm up, which would explain the goosebumps. I tried to be persistent and insist that we have our night out but in my head all I really wanted to do was cuddle up in bed and sleep. We talked through it and decided that with school Monday I should do all I can to stay well, so I agreed to go home after work. By the time we got back, I had an actual fever and was really feeling drained.

No one expected that I had the flu and that it would last as long as it did. I had plans to go ice skating on Saturday, which in my head believed I could still go. I was very mistaken. I had fever spikes in the early morning, late morning and afternoon/evening Saturday. Each spike lasted about four hours between getting the chills and then having my fever spike up to 102. The doctor’s didn’t want to see me because they suspected it was the flu and didn’t want me spreading my germs in their office. Since the flu is a viral infection there is nothing they could do for me. I could have got a prescription for Tamiflu, but my parents didn’t like its risky side effects.

Saturday, Sunday and Monday were the worst days with three or four fevers in a 24- hour period. Tuesday I only had two episodes, Wednesday I had one at night and zero on Thursday. I was very weak by Thursday though from all the tensing and shivering the chills gave me and from lying in bed for almost a week. When I had a fever I would get awful headaches and experience dizziness, so I only got up when I had to.

My parents wanted me to go 48 hours without a fever to make sure it wouldn’t come back. This took me up to Friday so I missed the whole first week of classes. I decided to stay home then until Monday since we had a long weekend and I didn’t get to spend the time with my family that I wanted to the previous weekend. I planned to take the train back to Mount Union (which would have been 12 hours long) but my dad graciously offered to drive me back on Monday to save me the hassle. I was really grateful for that! I made it back to Mount Union on Monday around lunchtime. I was happy to be back and healthy again. That was definitely the worst time I have ever been sick. I was lucky that I did not have other symptoms of the flu such as vomiting and diarrhea.

Want to know how I got back on track after missing a WHOLE week of class?! Read my next blog titled Getting Back on Track! Stay healthy this flu season! Getting the flu shot will not protect you though, the flu that developed is a different kind so make sure to germ-x frequently and do not share anything!

Zero Dark Thirty, A Must See

Zero Dark Thirty, A Must See

This past weekend I had the opportunity to see Zero Dark Thirty in theaters with my roommates, the story about an elite team of intelligence and military operatives, working in secret across the globe, devoting themselves to a single goal: to find and eliminate Osama bin Laden. The film is up for 5 Academy awards … Read more

This past weekend I had the opportunity to see Zero Dark Thirty in theaters with my roommates, the story about an elite team of intelligence and military operatives, working in secret across the globe, devoting themselves to a single goal: to find and eliminate Osama bin Laden. The film is up for 5 Academy awards and has been met with wide acclaim from film critics, currently holding a 93% “fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 170 reviews and an average rating of 8.8/10, as well as a score of 95 on Metacritic based on 36 reviews. It is the best reviewed film of 2012 according to Metacriti. The film was jaw-dropping, and an amazing creation, one I highly recommend to see.

Click here to watch the trailer!

Despite its praise, there has been quite some controversy as well over allegations of partisanshipimproper access to classified information and taking pro-torture stance. Several republican sources charged the Obama Administration of improperly providing Bigelow and her team access to classified information during their research for the film. These charges, along with charges of other leaks to the media, became a prevalent election season conservative talking point, and had also found their way onto the Republican National Convention party platform, which claimed Obama “has tolerated publicizing the details of the operation to kill the leader of Al Qaeda.In January 2013, it was reported that the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee will review the contacts between the CIA and the filmmakers to find out whether they had inappropriate access to classified information.

The film has been both criticized and praised for its handling of subject matter involving interrogation and torture. Glenn Greenwald, in The Guardian, stated that it “presents torture as its CIA proponents and administrators see it: as a dirty, ugly business that is necessary to protect America,” while Frank Bruni similarly concluded that the film appears to suggest “No waterboarding, no Bin Laden.” In my eyes, if you are dealing with the most dangerous people in the entire world, mild torture may have to be met, given that people are received basic necessities for life. An interview with Mark Boal and Mark Bowden discusses the film’s controversial depiction of enhanced interrogation, if you care to watch.

Whether you are completely for or against the movie, I feel that if you live in the United States of America, you should definitely make an effort to watch this film. It is truly amazing to see how long, in depth, dangerous, but also seamless this effort was. It really opens your eyes, is inspiring and makes you want to create some change or do something meaningful. I also recommend reading No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama Bin Laden, which my roommate recommended. From an Amazon book description, “for the first time anywhere, the first-person account of the planning and execution of the Bin Laden raid from a Navy Seal who confronted the terrorist mastermind and witnessed his final moments. From the streets of Iraq to the rescue of Captain Richard Phillips in the Indian Ocean, and from the mountaintops of Afghanistan to the third floor of Osama Bin Laden’s compound, operator Mark Owen of the U.S. Naval Special Warfare Development Group–commonly known as SEAL Team Six– has been a part of some of the most memorable special operations in history, as well as countless missions that never made headlines.”

I hope you enjoy reading or watching or even researching about this mission. Even myself, who tends to not talk politics much and only think about military in the game Call of Duty, highly advise you to get to the nearest theater soon.

It’s up.

It’s up.

After a week of stressing out, warming up and winding down, the cast list for Company has finally been posted. Monday and Tuesday of this week were auditions. Everyone had to prepare 32 bars of music and a one minute monologue. Wednesday the callbacks list was posted, and Thursday was callbacks. And today, oh beautiful … Read more

After a week of stressing out, warming up and winding down, the cast list for Company has finally been posted.

Cast List

Monday and Tuesday of this week were auditions. Everyone had to prepare 32 bars of music and a one minute monologue.

Wednesday the callbacks list was posted, and Thursday was callbacks.

And today, oh beautiful waited-for day, the cast list was posted.

Trying out for a show is a pretty thrilling experience, and I wonder if it looks silly to the outsider.

We were all definitely frantically finding 32 bars of music that adequately showed off our voices, and a monologue that showed we can act. Some people were even frantically memorizing their monologues an hour before auditions!

Then, there’s this shuffle of excitement to see the callback list. I always have this image in my head of the scene from Patch Adams where all the med students cram around the posted paper to see their grade.

For callbacks, auditioners are given a specific song to sing, depending on what part they’re being considered for. So everyone with a callback essentially has 30 hours or so to learn a Sondheim song. No easy feat, but it was pretty fun.

Then, it’s just a matter of waiting. Waiting, innocently walking past the board every half hour or so to see if the list is up. Or if you’re like me, you’re sitting in a class you can’t skip waiting for a text message.

When you receive two little words, you know your fate is officially sealed:

“It’s up.”

So the cast has officially been announced for the spring musical, and we’re about to embark on a semester-long journey of singing, acting and having an awesome time.

Come see the show! April 4, 5, 6, 11, 12 and 13 at 8 p.m., and a 2:30 matinee on April 7.

I’m a part of that

It’s never fun being sick. I’m one of those lucky people who is experiencing a cold and sore throat right now. And generally, that really sucks. EXCEPT when it comes to choir. You’re probably like, “What?” But let me explain. When you’re sick, you can’t sing with the choir. It’s not good for your voice, … Read more

It’s never fun being sick. I’m one of those lucky people who is experiencing a cold and sore throat right now.

And generally, that really sucks.

EXCEPT when it comes to choir.

You’re probably like, “What?”

But let me explain. When you’re sick, you can’t sing with the choir. It’s not good for your voice, and there’s the chance you’ll make other choir members sick.

So, you get to sit out when you’re sick. And listen to the choir thing.

It’s really a nice gift on the days you’re sick.

For once, you get to experience what the audience experiences. And let me tell you: It’s pretty awesome.

We’re learning some new songs this semester, and even in their learning stages, I can tell these songs are going to be beautiful.

I sat out Thursday from choir, and sometime between all the awesome music I got to thinking, “I’m a part of that sound.” I am a part of that fantastic group of music-making people.

No matter what I do after college, I know I was part of one of the best groups Mount Union has to offer. That’s pretty cool, and that’ll make anyone with a sore throat feel better.

Diversify for the future.

Throughout the Martin Luther King, Jr. Week, I have been helping out here and there with some of the events. The Tunnel of Oppression really hit home as we were preparing for it. I looked up all the incidents that has happened over the past 3 years in my home of Malaysia and it was … Read more

Throughout the Martin Luther King, Jr. Week, I have been helping out here and there with some of the events. The Tunnel of Oppression really hit home as we were preparing for it. I looked up all the incidents that has happened over the past 3 years in my home of Malaysia and it was really hard to swallow.

On Tuesday, January 22, presidents of the diversity organizations presented their dreams for diversity. The presentation was held in T&H 100. I took a different approach as to what I wanted to say. As president of the Association of International Students, it was hard to try compressing the issues of the entire world into a short 5-7 minute presentation/speech.

Here’s a slightly modified version of my speech. A UMU Blog exclusive? I say yes.

International students on campus provide a unique cultural exchange. It helps students who have not experienced other cultures to be more aware of the world outside their borders.

I come from Malaysia’s island state of Penang, where 1.5 million people coexist in a state that’s only 1/5 the size of Delaware. Malaysians, just like most Americans, were immigrants; though my country has a much shorter timeline than that of the United States. I grew up alongside my peers, coming from different ethnic backgrounds and religions. We have Chinese people speaking an Indian dialect and Indians speaking a Chinese dialect, sometimes better than a Chinese, like myself.

What I’m trying to say is that I know what it’s like to live in a very diverse community.

But this is not about me.

Today we live in a world where people from many different places find themselves in a common environment. People are travelling more these days whether it’s for work, for travel, or like all of us, for school. Demographics are changing and the advancement of modern technology also makes the world much smaller than it used to be.

We as the Association of International Students think that in a perfect world, people will be judged by their character and not by their heritage or the color of their skin.

Martin Luther King, Jr. said that “Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

Nothing is more dangerous than when one indulges in his foolishness and prides on his kind while mocking that of others; when one knowingly refuses to know and discriminates people for being unfamiliar. Discrimination of any kind is a result of sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.

Cultures have collided for a long time now. This is no new phenomenon. Unfortunately, pride and ignorance plagues the world. I can understand. It is much easier to just sit back and rest on what you know rather than putting yourself in an unfamiliar situation with unfamiliar people.

We are still a work in progress. We are not yet the world Martin Luther King, Jr. had envisioned when he took a stand; when he decided to speak for those who had no voice. We are still being identified by our race, religion or which part of the world we came from. Why?

Does it really matter? Other than our passports, is it necessary to have our nationalities stated? On IDs, is it necessary to have our race and religion stated when all we really need are our names, age and gender? Does it matter if someone is a Chinese Muslim, a Caucasian Christian, a Latino Jew or an African Buddhist? The answer is no. I am not less friendly to my peers in the Diversity Council because of their culture, ethnicity or religion. I am also not any friendlier to someone from my side of the world just because they look similar to me.

We are not one collective being. Asians, for example, are not all good at math. I remember in my first semester here, I caught the guy next to me trying to cheat off my paper in our calculus exam. Well he certainly picked the wrong Asian to cheat off now, didn’t he? Cause I suck at math. By assuming what my abilities are because of my skin color, he probably didn’t do too well on that exam.

Jokes aside, we cannot let ignorance continue to block progress. Whether we like it or not, the world is changing; becoming more mixed every single day. We cannot choose to not know and expect the world to just conform into one monotonous being. While many things can be universalized, like which side of the road we should drive on or what measuring system we should use, many things, important things, cannot and should not.

We should embrace diversity, appreciating the spectrum that makes the world colorful, instead of expecting the world to be just one way or hate it because it’s another. Our heritage, our culture, things like that are what’s important for us to know where we came from and understand how we got here, but it should not be the defining part about us. We need to see people for who they are and not what they are. To move forward, we need to stand firm on who we are, but also allow others the same privilege.

What do you think?

When in Rome

When in Rome

There are almost no words to describe Rome. This weekend I got to travel to the city and it surpassed all of my expectations. From eating my first gelato in front of the Trevi Fountain to standing with my polka dot umbrella in front of the Colosseum, I felt as though I was living out … Read more

There are almost no words to describe Rome. This weekend I got to travel to the city and it surpassed all of my expectations. From eating my first gelato in front of the Trevi Fountain to standing with my polka dot umbrella in front of the Colosseum, I felt as though I was living out a scene in a movie. This is the stuff you see on the big screen, with a bag of popcorn on your lap, yet I was seeing it with my own eyes. I still can’t believe I was just a few feet away from the Colosseum. I am so blessed.

The day began with a 7:30 a.m. meeting time to catch the 8 a.m. train. However, since there was about an inch of snow, the train was delayed. We were told that Italy never gets snow, so when it does snow, no one knows what to do. Trains are delayed, people go into major panic and the streets are filled with crazy drivers (and this is different from any other time?). I wasn’t too upset about the delay though, since that meant I had an extra hour to slip into a cozy café and order a breakfast pastry. Although one that I had tried before looked tempting, I promised myself to try new things so I picked out a croissant with wild berry fruit inside. Delicious!

The first thing we saw in Rome was the Vatican. I had no interest in seeing the Vatican, mostly because I had no idea about its significance or history before we went. However, the second I walked inside I was speechless. Every single inch of the walls, ceilings and floors has so much detail. It is absolutely amazing. I could have stayed in the Vatican for hours just staring at the ceiling itself.

vatican

Next we visited the Pantheon. I was surprised to learn that the ceiling of the Pantheon is open and there are slits in the floor to allow for water to drain into when it rains. Mass is still held there even when it rains. We came across the cutest gelato and crepe store right next to the Pantheon that I can’t wait to take my sisters to when they visit!

pantheon

We then visited Piazza Novana, which was a big open piazza with two fountains. Although it was pretty, I was hardly paying attention since our tour guide announced that the Trevi Fountain would be next. I was literally giddy with excitement. I was a bit embarrassed as I could not fight back the biggest smile ever from sliding across my face. Before you see the fountain, you hear the water flowing, which builds even more anticipation. Closing my eyes to make a wish and toss a coin into the Trevi Fountain was definitely the highlight of the trip for me.

After the Trevi Fountain, we visited the Spanish Steps and then we were free for lunch. While the rest of the kids in the program then went back to Viterbo, a group of us decided to stay at a hostel for the night so that we could see more of Rome! Before finding the hostel, we grabbed some gelato and saw the Trevi Fountain lit up. I was so excited for my first gelato. I got melon flavored!

trevi fountain

The next morning we visited the Colosseum! It was so incredible to be standing right there, in front of it. I decided to wait to tour the inside until my sisters visit, so we could do it together.

colosseum

After the Colosseum, we did some souvenir shopping, revisited the Trevi Fountain and Pantheon and grabbed lunch. We then made our way back to the train station so that we could catch the next train back to Viterbo. However, pleased that we got to the station literally three minutes before the train was to arrive, we then noticed we forgot to purchase tickets. Panic mode set in. Our group sent me and two of my roommates to run as fast as we could through the station to buy tickets and return within the next three minutes… even though we just traveled up four flights of stairs, a broken escalator and around the corner from the ticket counter to get to the train platform. I have never ran so fast in my entire life. The fact that I just had a slice of pizza and potato wedges for lunch was not helping whatsoever. There were two people in front of us as we stood at the counter, gasping for air, praying for them to hurry. Of course, the man at the ticket counter decided to take his sweet time. The second he handed us our tickets, I heard the train arrive above. My roommates and I looked at each other and yelled “run!” Back around the corner we went, up four flights of stairs, the broken escalator, and finally to the train platform, all the while wishing that I had skipped the potato wedges and would have been previously trained for a 5k so that I was ready for this moment. We finally reached the top of the train platform, only to see the end of the train pulling away. So, we collapsed onto a bench and had an hour to catch our breath until the next train.

This weekend was absolutely exhausting, but amazing. I am hoping that tossing my coin into the Trevi Fountain does in fact ensure me a return trip to Rome one day.

How to audition

The auditions for the spring musical are in a few days! To warm us all up and to give the auditioners an idea of what to expect, Mount Union’s Department of Theatre hosted a master class on how to audition. It was a really cool event. We had a woman there, Lindsey, who Kevin Kern met … Read more

The auditions for the spring musical are in a few days! To warm us all up and to give the auditioners an idea of what to expect, Mount Union’s Department of Theatre hosted a master class on how to audition.

It was a really cool event. We had a woman there, Lindsey, who Kevin Kern met during a summer show. She demonstrated a song and a monologue and went through the motions of auditioning.

Here’s what we learned:

1. Treat your accompanist with respect. Accompanists, for whatever reason, get a certain amount of disrespect in some vocal settings. That’s not cool, ever.

2. Dress appropriately. You should look more like you’re ready for a job interview than having just come straight from the gym.

3. Walk in with confidence. If a director sees a confident person walk across the stage, he knows that’s someone he can trust with a part.

4. Introduce yourself. There is no need to introduce the piece you’ll perform. The director will likely figure it out.

5. Act the song you sing! A director isn’t only looking for vocal talent; he/she wants to know you can act!

6. Avoid character voices. The director wants to hear YOUR voice.

7. Try to avoid picking Sondheim and other difficult pieces. If the accompanist messes up, you look bad. Always.

8. Never say, “Oh I have a cold.” All it sounds like is excuses, excuses, excuses.  A director will be able to tell if you were sick recently.

9. Politely say thank you at the end of your audition and leave as confidently as you entered.

That’s how to audition!

A Whole Year Without Plastic?!

A Whole Year Without Plastic?!

I posted a few days ago about my new haircut, which I inadvertently made as a New Year’s resolution I guess. So, bring on 2014. I already knocked out and completed my goal for 2013! Kidding. I didn’t want to come up with some standard resolutions that everyone does, even though they still exist on the bottom … Read more

I posted a few days ago about my new haircut, which I inadvertently made as a New Year’s resolution I guess. So, bring on 2014. I already knocked out and completed my goal for 2013! Kidding. I didn’t want to come up with some standard resolutions that everyone does, even though they still exist on the bottom of my list, but my top resolution is a rather lofty and impactful goal.

2013 Resolution: Rise Above Plastics. Attempt to go a whole year without using, or significantly reducing my plastic footprint.

I was very inspired by this after I attended the East Coast Chapter Summit with the Surfrider Foundation, and really hope to follow through on cutting out as much plastic as possible. The facts are pretty evident I quickly found out, and in many parts of our oceans there exists this sort of plasticy soup, a gyre as it’s called. According to the organization Rise Above Plastics, plastic is all around us. It’s in our homes, our offices, our vehicles, our yards and our playgrounds. We use it to package food, bottle products, bag produce, make dinnerware and utensils, make toys and more.

Plastics have undoubtedly helped us to manufacture, package and ship goods more easily, for less money, and in some cases, more safely than ever before. But, plastics pose a significant threat to our planet as well. Part of the problem is plastic itself. The very qualities that make it an adaptable and durable product to use, also make plastic an environmental nightmare. You see, plastics do not biodegrade. Instead they photodegrade – breaking down under exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays, into smaller and smaller pieces.

The bottom line is that with the exception of the small amount that has been incinerated, virtually every piece of plastic that was ever made still exists in some shape or form.

The Rise Above Plastic’s mission is simple: to reduce the impacts of plastics in the marine environment by raising awareness about the dangers of plastic pollution and by advocating for a reduction of single-use plastics and the recycling of all plastics. I encourage you to follow ‘RAP’ on Facebook and Twitter, and be a leader and advocate for change. “Ban the Bag” from your city if you are so empowered to do so.

Some other easy things you can do to reduce your ‘plastic footprint’ and help keep plastics out of the marine environment are choosing to reuse when it comes to shopping bags and bottled water; refuse single-serving packaging, excess packaging, straws and other ‘disposable’ plastics; reduce everyday plastics such as sandwich bags and juice cartons; bring your to-go mug with you; and recycle! If you must use plastic, try to choose #1 (PETE) or #2 (HDPE), which are the most commonly recycled plastics. Avoid plastic bags and polystyrene foam as both typically have very low recycling rates. Wish me luck!

For more ‘green’ resolutions, check out this post.

The Dying Village

The Dying Village

Today was exhausting, yet amazing! This morning I woke up early to go to the open air markets. My roommates and I met with a few other students and our program advisors and walked through a hundred or so little stands of jewelry, shoes, clothing, fabric and little odds and ends. Everything is very cheap … Read more

Today was exhausting, yet amazing! This morning I woke up early to go to the open air markets. My roommates and I met with a few other students and our program advisors and walked through a hundred or so little stands of jewelry, shoes, clothing, fabric and little odds and ends. Everything is very cheap at the market. The highlight of the market for me was the yellow lab puppy that was there. When I ran to pet the puppy, my first instinct was to yell “Hi, puppy!” but instead I said, “Ciao, cucciolo!” I am learning bit by bit.

After the open air market, we went to the fresh fruit market. I bought two fresh tomatoes and fresh mozzarella cheese, with the help of one of our “Italian buddies” from the program. I plan on buying basil and fresh bread tomorrow morning and making some sort of bruschetta for dinner tomorrow night. Afterwards, we walked to the art store and I bought a sketch pad and pencils for my art class! On the way back to the apartment, one of the year-long study abroad students showed us a little park, just outside the city walls. Although it is small, it is very pretty. I already know I will be spending many afternoons with my running shoes or my sketch pad there.

dying village

This afternoon we went on field trip to Civita di Bagnoregio, also known as “The Dying Village.” This village was built by the Etruscans hundreds of years ago. Due to an earthquake, the village is eroding and it is no longer safe to live there. All of the residents had to vacate to a different town. However, we were told that around eight or so people still live there! There are also a few little cafes and shops for tourists. I am not sure if I have ever seen a more beautiful place. It was so peaceful there. While it was absolutely freezing, I found that I often forgot about how cold I was walking around because I was so captivated by the village. However, while I would love to live in such a beautiful place, I believe I would get very lonely since it feels very deserted.

dying village 2

After we got back, my roommates Sarah and Kyung Min, and I went to “The Spaghetteria” for dinner. The Spaghetteria offers 300 different types of spaghetti! Anyone who knows me, knows how ridiculously indecisive I am and can only imagine how long it took me to decide on which dish to order. While my instinct was to order the traditional dish with tomato sauce and fresh herbs, I decided to order the dish called “saruzzo.” The description read: herb field and black olives. While it was not at all what I was expecting, I am proud that I tried something different! It was really good. I am sure that we will go back again to try out another spaghetti dish soon!

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