Author Archives: Kelsey Tomlinson

Band concert

Coming up this weekend is the concert band and wind ensemble concert! It’s going to be quite a show, and I am really excited. For one thing, we’re playing a bunch of fun music. We’re doing a Rent medley, and also the theme from Captain America. We’re also doing this really challenging piece called Helm … Read more

Coming up this weekend is the concert band and wind ensemble concert!

It’s going to be quite a show, and I am really excited.

For one thing, we’re playing a bunch of fun music. We’re doing a Rent medley, and also the theme from Captain America.

We’re also doing this really challenging piece called Helm Toccata. It’s got this really interesting rhythm where it seems like you can’t keep track of the beat. It switches from 4/4 to 3/4 and back quite often so it’ll really keeps the audience moving.

And, there’s this really special piece being performed. It’s in two parts, and it was actually written by one of our seniors! Jenna Linville is looking to go to grad school for music composition, and this is one of her works. It’s called Chasing the Horizon and it’s really fantastic. If you come out for nothing else on Sunday, you should come out to support the student who wrote it.

It’ll be this Sunday at 3 p.m. in Rodman Playhouse.

There will also be a cookie reception to follow, sponsored by Kappa Kappa Psi, the marching band fraternity.

It’ll be a great Sunday, and an excellent showcase of some of the musical talent at Mount Union.

See you there!

Relay for Life is music themed!

Relay for Life is music themed!

This year’s going to be really cool. They always come up with such fun themes. This year it’s Relay for Life: Battle of the Ban(d) Cancer. So it’s like, we’re banning cancer! I’m super excited it’s music themed too. We have a team from the Department of Music, and our theme is “Please Don’t Stop … Read more

This year’s going to be really cool. They always come up with such fun themes. This year it’s Relay for Life: Battle of the Ban(d) Cancer. So it’s like, we’re banning cancer!

I’m super excited it’s music themed too. We have a team from the Department of Music, and our theme is “Please Don’t Stop the Music.” Basically, people can pay us to go follow someone around and play an annoying song at them, and they have to pay us to stop playing.

I, for one, am learning “It’s a Small World After All.” Ya know, that really annoying and repetitive song from the Disney ride? Hee hee !

I think that’ll get some pretty interesting reviews.

I’m just excited for the night in general though too. Each hour is going to be a different theme of music, so that’ll be pretty cool. For example, there’s going to be 50’s at 7 p.m., and a rave at 4 a.m. There’s also going to be 80s, 90s, 2K, country, pop, R&B, line dancing—pretty much any musical genre you could ever come up with.

Did you hear that? A RAVE of techno music is going to be happening this weekend at Mount Union. I know I’m going to be there. How about you?

As the WRMU program director, I’m kind of heading up DJ-ing for the event. That’s 18 hours of music, and I am READY!

We stay up all night because “cancer doesn’t sleep.” Our goal is 18 straight hours of fundraising.

I can’t wait to have a ton of fun with my friends and raise some money to help fight cancer!

It’s this Friday (April 19) at 6 p.m. until Saturday April 20 at noon. It’ll be in the Peterson Field House in the MAAC. If you want to participate or donate, go here!

Hope to see you there!

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End of the semester blues

End of the semester blues

It’s getting to be that time again! Everyone is starting to cram, stress out, get worried about graduation, worry about finals, staying up late doing projects, skipping meals to get a little more work done, pull all nighters, hunt for summer jobs, freak out—- STOP!!! Whew. You can’t let the semester get you carried away. … Read more

It’s getting to be that time again!

Everyone is starting to cram, stress out, get worried about graduation, worry about finals, staying up late doing projects, skipping meals to get a little more work done, pull all nighters, hunt for summer jobs, freak out—-

STOP!!!

Whew. You can’t let the semester get you carried away. If you don’t have your health, you haven’t got anything! Musicians, theatre people, athletes, Greeks, scholars–you name it, everyone is busy.

Here are some tips for making the end of the semester a good one:

Get some sleep:
Here’s what happens. For every hour after midnight you stay up, your body needs more sleep. So staying up late will actually make you exponentially more tired! So, try to plan out your evenings better so you don’t have to stay up. Or, if you know you’re only gonna get a few hours of sleep, try waking up early instead of staying up late. Still rough, but not as rough on your body.

Don’t skip meals:
We all know this. You can’t deny your body the energy it needs to carry on. You’ll get more accomplished in the long run if you’re giving your body the right stuff! You can only run on fumes for so long, and your quality of work will suffer the more you do.

Give your voice a break!
Whether you’re singing in the choir or giving a speech for a class, you want your voice to stay with you all semester. Don’t go crazy yelling at your video games or cheering on your favorite athletics team. No one likes a sore throat! And, if you feel one coming on, go on vocal rest! You just don’t talk unless absolutely necessary! It’s even kind of fun to just listen and observe life for a little.

Hang out with friends!
I know this sounds silly, but… what are you going to remember more in five years? That time you stayed up late finishing a paper or that time you walked barefoot around campus with a buddy? I’m not saying pick socializing over academics, obviously that’s important. But remember that mental health is part of health too! Here’s an idea: make friend time an incentive for getting work done quickly!

Get off of Facebook!
Seriously, it’s getting to be a bit of a dying fad anyway. I’m sure no one will miss you online anyway, especially since you’ll be hanging out with them in real life more often anyway! Facebook is the antithesis of getting homework done. Think of how much less stressed you’ll feel when you don’t waste hours on Facebook!

 

Do homework outside!

My freshman year, I completed a final paper and a project while sitting beside the lakes. It’s a beautiful campus, and we’re about to get some beautiful weather. I PROMISE it’s so much more enjoyable getting work done when the sun is shining on your back. You’ll probably get work done even faster because you’re enjoying what you’re doing!

Keep a planner!
I keep a planner. It’s huge. But I never forget to do anything, and I can budget my time appropriately because of it. Keeping a planner is great for organization and keeping track of things. Instead of remembering things by yourself, use the aid of a planner.

So those are my tips. I think they apply to everyone on campus, whether you’re interested in music, arts, sports, Greek life–whatever. Let’s just make this end of the semester a good one!

Cheers.

A day in the sun…

A day in the sun…

So here’s something really cool that happened.                   Everyone’s sitting out and enjoying the sun and each others company! I love a good cookout every once in a while, but there’s nothing quite like a theatre cookout. We had a matinee performance last Sunday, and I thought, … Read more

So here’s something really cool that happened.

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Everyone’s sitting out and enjoying the sun and each others company!

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I love a good cookout every once in a while, but there’s nothing quite like a theatre cookout.

We had a matinee performance last Sunday, and I thought, why not have a cookout after the musical? The show would end around 4:30 p.m., and we could have a 5 p.m. cook out.

It was so much FUN! I really appreciate all the help I got from Rudy and Kevin. They’re really supportive of all the social and theatre endeavors of the theatre club.

We took up a cemented grilling area in the courtyard of the Union Townhouses and pretty much just enjoyed one of the first warm days of April.

We flew some kites, played tag and ate lots of food. It was a pot luck, so there was plenty to go around. We even got to hear Jacob Ward’s monologue from a play he’s in right now.

I appreciate that there aren’t just clubs at Mount Union. These aren’t organizations occupied by people who don’t see each other outside of their meetings. You find real friends here, and I’m always happy to hang out with them.

It was a great day with great people and great food, at a great place.

 

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Some of our Alpha Psi members (Nicolina Nolletti, Jacob Ward, Rosie Tabaj)

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Playing tag!

You never know…

You never know…

Class of 2013 – Traveled to Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, to work with the West Indies Christian Mission Row 1: Alison Hendrickson, Julie Jakmides, Jenny Gamertsfelder, Sarah Wroblewski, Jon Borrego. Row 2: Steve Kramer, Amy Ricciardi, Emily Christmas, Kelsey Tomlinson, Naoko Oyabu-Mathis, Zak Suhar. Row 3: Kody Severino, Megan Merlene, Kelly Slutz, Kathy Girton (host), … Read more

DRtrip

Class of 2013 – Traveled to Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, to work with the West Indies Christian Mission

Row 1: Alison Hendrickson, Julie Jakmides, Jenny Gamertsfelder, Sarah Wroblewski, Jon Borrego.
Row 2: Steve Kramer, Amy Ricciardi, Emily Christmas, Kelsey Tomlinson, Naoko Oyabu-Mathis, Zak Suhar.
Row 3: Kody Severino, Megan Merlene, Kelly Slutz, Kathy Girton (host), Elana Anderson (cook), Mike Patterson, Jonathan Espacio (guide).

Over spring break, I had the opportunity to travel to the Dominican Republic on a service trip. It was part of the social responsibility and personal well-being course offered at Mount Union, and it was quite an awesome experience.

It was an AMAZING experience. I learned so much about another culture, the other people on the trip and myself. I’ve had a lot of opportunities to grow and do service at Mount Union, but this one was definitely one of the best.

We did a lot of work while over there. We mixed cement the old-fashioned way, we painted at least six rooms and we helped feed more than 200 people in a dump village. In a dump village, people actually live in little communities next to the local landfill, and that’s where they get their meals.

I also learned a lot about the people on the trip with me. Every night we would share our life stories, and I grew to realize that with any given person, I have a lot more in common with them than not. I look at life and people a little differently now because of that.

BUT! You’re probably wondering what this has to do with music and the arts, since I typically blog about the arts. Well, I’ll tell you.

Before we headed to the Dominican Republic, our host Kathy Girton asked what we were interested in and good at. She wanted to know what we could do with any kids we worked with, and how to make the free day enjoyable. So naturally, I said singing and music.

Well! On day one, we were headed to work with a bunch of kids. And we worked with a ton of kids; that was probably a majority of the trip. We played with bubbles, jump ropes or just gave them piggyback rides. It was awesome.

But I digress. On day one, Kathy hands me this book of Spanish songs. And I’m like: Uh oh. I don’t know any of these songs, if I mess up all the kids will know…

So I look through the pages. Then I realize, I CAN read this music! We’ve been learning solfeg in choir for the last three years! Solfeg is a method of assigning notes a syllable, like do, re, mi, fa, so, la, ti. Because the intervals between the syllables never change, I can assign syllables to notes in music and sight-read it.

And that’s exactly what I did. Within minutes I had a song or two completely down, and I was so excited.

First, because it was really empowering. I could have been totally lost, but I wasn’t.

Second, because it was so great to use my music knowledge! People say, “Why do I have to take this class, I’ll never use it.” Well, you never truly know where you’re gonna use the knowledge you acquire in a class. And this Dominican Republic moment proves it!

For pictures of our trip, check out this video!

Opening night

Opening night of Company was last night! It was incredible, to start with. It’s a fantastic show that takes a lot of talent to pull off, and I personally think the show was a great success. I’m so ready to have 6 more performances. The thing I really thought was special, though, was director Kevin … Read more

Opening night of Company was last night!

It was incredible, to start with. It’s a fantastic show that takes a lot of talent to pull off, and I personally think the show was a great success. I’m so ready to have 6 more performances.

The thing I really thought was special, though, was director Kevin Kern‘s pre-show speech.

He opened with a favorite quote of his, which I’m going to paraphrase:

“Until someone has participated in a cause larger than themselves, they can never be truly whole.”

I think that’s so true. Being part of something greater than yourself is the most rewarding thing anyone can do. I think there’s a certain kind of completion that can only come from something you achieve with others.

A large part of my arts experience here at Mount Union has been all about collaboration. Because of that mindset, I’ve accomplished a lot of things (both in and out of the art world) and I am grateful that our art departments teach that way.

Kevin then talked about truly appreciating the moment of the show. He said to leave all our energy on stage. And that’s true. When you give an awesome performance, you should leave the stage utterly exhausted.

He quoted Vince Lombardi next:

“I firmly believe that any man’s finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle – victorious.”

Being part of the play is fulfilling our passions. For some of the cast, it will be a profession someday. But all of us are really passionate about theatre. And Kevin made the point that there are people all over the world who wish they could do what we do on that stage. So we owe it to ourselves, to each other and to everyone else out there to do the very best we can, and love every minute of it.

Finally, Kevin recommended sitting on the stage for a minute after the show. After the costumes and make up come off, after the audience has cleared out–but before venturing out to see the crowd. Just to take a minute and sit on the field of victory and cherish the moment.

So that’s what I did, and I know a couple other cast members did. And Kevin and Lombardi were right. There is nothing quite so sweet as a moment of appreciating what you’ve just accomplished.

The show is coming, the show is coming!

I’m starting to get so excited; the musical Company is just a week away! We just started putting light cues together last night at rehearsal. It made for an interesting rehearsal. Usually they’re called cue-to-cue rehearsals, because we’re literally acting from light cue to light cue. That means we’re freezing wherever there’s supposed to be … Read more

I’m starting to get so excited; the musical Company is just a week away!

We just started putting light cues together last night at rehearsal. It made for an interesting rehearsal. Usually they’re called cue-to-cue rehearsals, because we’re literally acting from light cue to light cue. That means we’re freezing wherever there’s supposed to be a change in the lights.

It’s really a cool process. I appreciate that our Department of Theatre professors are professional and very good at what they do. It’s because of lights, sounds, staging, and costumes that our shows consistently look fabulous.

The show is really starting to come together too. Everything is memorized and show-ready, and every night we improve things in the show—even when it already seems like we can’t improve much more!

The curtains are hung, the props are all ready. We’re performing with a darkened audience and lights and a pit band. We’re ready.

This is going to be a fabulous show. I can’t stop talking about it to people—which is why I’m blogging about it :)

Seriously, if you want to see one of the coolest musicals Mount Union has put on stage, come see the musical! Plus, it’s the last one ever being performed in Rodman Playhouse! Of course we’re going to go out with a bang!

The show is April 4-6, 11-13 at 7:30 p.m. and April 7 at 2 p.m. To order tickets, call (330) 821-2565.

Music for the show

Let’s talk about the pit band for a minute here. We’ve been working on Company for weeks now, with the vocal music director Ian LeRoy. He’s a junior music performance major, and he’s been doing an excellent job. Come see the show, and you’ll know what I’m talking about. The first thing you’re going to hear … Read more

Let’s talk about the pit band for a minute here.

We’ve been working on Company for weeks now, with the vocal music director Ian LeRoy. He’s a junior music performance major, and he’s been doing an excellent job.

Come see the show, and you’ll know what I’m talking about. The first thing you’re going to hear is an a capella bit that leads to a cluster chord–basically, a lot of notes at the same time. It’ll make you shiver it’s so good.

So acting, check. Vocals, check. What we needed was the band.

And they are sounding pretty incredible. With everything from two pianists, a ‘cello, trumpets, and more, we are gonna have such an amazing sound for this performance.

I think the only relatively difficult thing thus far has been nailing down the times. But now we’re golden.

Here’s some things to listen for, voally and instrumentally:

1. The opening of the show. It’s just jaw-dropping.

2. The girlfriends’ trio. Their voices are gorgeous and complement each other very well.

3. The sax in the opening of The Ladies Who Lunch scene. Junior Ian Bell :)

4. Anything the husbands sing together.

5. The end of Someone is Waiting and Sorry Grateful. Senior Kenny Leep and junior Jesse Phillips are going to make every girl in the room fall in love with them.

6. Another Hundred People by freshman Erin Bell

(PS, have I mentioned that all the other girls in the show besides me are freshmen? Such a talented freshman class, holy wow!)

Just wanted to give you a couple things to look forward to :) Come see the show!

The show is April 4-6, 11-13 at 8 p.m. and Sunday April 7 at 2 p.m. at Rodman Playhouse

Students’ art in Crandall

Students’ art in Crandall

It’s that time of year again! Crandall Art Gallery has changed its contents. And this time, it’s all students’ work. Every year, the Department of Art opens up an art competition for spots in Crandall Gallery. You don’t have to be an art major or minor to do this, so any student is free to enter! And … Read more

It’s that time of year again!
Crandall Art Gallery has changed its contents. And this time, it’s all students’ work. Every year, the Department of Art opens up an art competition for spots in Crandall Gallery. You don’t have to be an art major or minor to do this, so any student is free to enter! And as per usual, this show was definitely not a let down!
I went to the reception and got pictures of some of the artists and their favorite pieces. This was a nice reception. There’s always food, but this time there were truffles. Yum! (Insert shameless plug for AVI’s catering haha). Anyway, the reception is always a great time to meet the artists, hear about their inspirations, etc. And when the artists are your peers, it’s especially awesome.
President Giese and his wife were there yesterday, along with a couple other higher ups at Mount Union. It’s possible that some lucky artist may see their work purchased and put somewhere on campus! My bet’s on Doug Laubacher. He’s a senior art major, and I’ve always heard of his work but never actually seen it. Until last night. I’m not even going to blog a picture of it because I want you to go to Crandall and see it for yourself. Isn’t that just cool!? You create art at Mount Union and it has the opportunity to be bought or showcased!

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Sophomore Jacob Ward

 

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Sophomore Wilma Levengood

Studio classes

If you’ve ever heard of music conservatories at colleges and universities, you’ve probably heard about the cutthroat nature of their programs. I’ve heard rumors of students putting razor blades between the keys of pianos, of students not speaking to each other, gossiping—needless to say it can get pretty ridiculous. What I’ve found at Mount Union … Read more

If you’ve ever heard of music conservatories at colleges and universities, you’ve probably heard about the cutthroat nature of their programs.

I’ve heard rumors of students putting razor blades between the keys of pianos, of students not speaking to each other, gossiping—needless to say it can get pretty ridiculous.

What I’ve found at Mount Union is entirely the opposite.

There’s certainly an aspect of personal success. They want everyone to do their best and accomplish a lot. But it’s NEVER at the expense of other students. We’re encouraged to succeed, but we’re also encouraged to support others’ successes.

It’s great. There’s an atmosphere of respect and celebration, not of rudeness and jealousy.

This kind of environment is literally the definition of music. Music is all about collaboration and humanity—what better way to embody those characteristics than teamwork and support?

The reason I’m blogging about this is because last night I went out with the piano students in Dr. Liliestedt’s piano studio. They had their performance, called Piano Keys, last night (It was fantastic, by the way!).

But I was really struck by the environment that Dr. Liliestedt has created. They cheer on each other’s successes and offer constructive criticism at their weekly studio classes. She even takes them out to dinner after performances to bond and talk about music.

A lot of the other applied lessons teachers are the same way. I know for a fact that Miss Weber and Mrs. Abbott also do studios where students constructively critique each other.

That’s what I like about Mount Union’s Department of Music. We, as students, want to succeed. And the faculty and students are behind us all the way.