Author Archives: Ivan Ng

About Ivan Ng

A senior at the University of Mount Union. Majoring in Media Studies (Communication) and a Minor in Spanish.

A New Leader for AIS!

A New Leader for AIS!

On Friday, March 23, the Association of International Students (AIS) began it’s transition towards a new administration. The election for the new executive board took place at 6 p.m. in the Alumni Room. A total of 45 members, foreign and American, turned up to meet the candidates running for a spot in the executive board as … Read more

On Friday, March 23, the Association of International Students (AIS) began it’s transition towards a new administration. The election for the new executive board took place at 6 p.m. in the Alumni Room. A total of 45 members, foreign and American, turned up to meet the candidates running for a spot in the executive board as well as cast their votes for their preferred candidates. Though AIS had more than 45 members, it was enough to reach a quorum; making sure that the election proceeded as planned.

The results of the election was announced to all AIS members via email an hour after the election.

President: Rachel Bateman (USA)

Vice-President: Andrea Toranzo (Bolivia)

Treasurer: Duc Le (Vietnam)

Secretary: Hoang Nguyen (Vietnam)

Program Directors: Ngoc Hoang (Vietnam) and Beteab Negash (Ethiopia)

Public Relations Officer: Xin Fang Mak (Malaysia)

Student Senate Representative: Nicolas Alvarado (Bolivia)

I am quite pleased with the results of the election. Both the president and the vice-president are existing AIS officers and I have worked closely with them throughout my presidency, which gives me great confidence that AIS is in good hands. As for the other elected officers, I have the same confidence in them. Some I have worked closely with on other things, while others gave a good vibe.

It has been a roller-coaster year for me leading the one association on campus that represents the most countries. While it was great fun meeting so many people from different parts of the world, it is also difficult to organize activities that are inclusive of all nationalities and cultures. Despite the challenges, it was a great experience overall.

It is a bittersweet feeling when I think about my time left with AIS and Mount Union. While I am excited to move on towards the next chapter of my life, it feels as though I am leaving a position and a place that I have been at for a long time. At least, it felt like a long time. I can only hope that my leadership this year has prepared the newly-elected executive board to take over.

Until that happens, I still have a job to do. Two of the biggest tasks I’ll be facing in the coming weeks are the budget proposal for the new academic year and the amendment of the AIS constitution. As for AIS in general, watch out for our end of the school year plans!

A Foreigner’s Guide: Surviving a Break on Campus

A Foreigner’s Guide: Surviving a Break on Campus

I am an international student. I am also a senior. That means that, at some point in my years here at Mount Union, I have spent some breaks on campus. Let me tell you this, it is quite an ordeal. There are also only a handful of things you can do at Mount Union during … Read more

Chapman

I am an international student. I am also a senior. That means that, at some point in my years here at Mount Union, I have spent some breaks on campus. Let me tell you this, it is quite an ordeal.

There are also only a handful of things you can do at Mount Union during the break. The gym has limited operating hours; shorter than that of the normal school days. The library hours are even more limited than the gym; making it hard for students to even make full use of it.

Don’t get me wrong, this is no rant. I am merely stating the living conditions for an international student during a break.

Just thinking about how to keep yourself well fed is another problem.

While the city of Alliance has an abundance of fast food restaurants, those surrounding the campus are only limited to Arby’s, Taco Bell, and Sheetz; three of which would not be the first choice for many students.

During breaks, long or short, the cafeteria closes. That would be acceptable if you really think about it. There will be very few students on campus and it would take more staff members to prepare the food than the number of people they are providing for. However, I strongly believe that the closure of the B&B Cafe during the break is very uncalled for.

Yes, this is the part where people try to tell me that there are many delivery services where I can get food delivered to my doorstep. That is true, but restaurants that deliver are basically pizza places and Chinese restaurants. Besides, wouldn’t you get bored eating fast food all week? Coming from a culture where most meals are home-made, seven days of fast food is equivalent to living on oatmeal.

While most students will be away, some remain; along with faculty members and staff. The B&B should be kept open to give students who choose to remain on campus an option. There are many places that students can go to get food in Alliance, but most international students do not have cars to take them there. I am one of the lucky few.

Here are some things an international student can do to survive the break (according to my experience before getting a car):

1. If you live in an apartment/townhouse, have a friend bring you grocery shopping.

- STOCK UP so that you can cook all break.

2. While you are essentially on break, operating hours for the gym and the library are limited.

- It is advisable to wake up before lunch so that you could get a nice workout or get some school work done in the library (if you need the books).

3. Start a project. Pick up some kind of activity to occupy your time.

- I made a dual-layer blanket. Other suggestions are knitting and a 10,000 piece puzzle.

4. Take a walk around campus with your camera.

- While not everyone will own a DSLR camera or have an interest in photography, realize that one day you will look back and realize that you did not take many pictures of our beautiful campus. Any camera, even your cell phone, will do. Create memories.

5. Find campus employment.

- There are several departments on campus that remain in operation throughout the break. If you are a communications student, the radio station in HPCC may have openings for you. Other places to look for employment are the library and the gym.

6. Find other students who are living on campus to hang out with.

- There may be other students on campus who did not go on a vacation during the break. Keep in touch with them and maybe plan something fun.

7. When all else fails, there is always studying class material to get ahead of the class.

It is becoming more common for international students these days to find a place to go to over the break. Some even have community friends or host families that take them away during the break. But if you find yourself stuck on campus during a break, go through numbers one to seven and see if anything works for you. They have worked for me and I am already a senior. That’s saying something!

How did I end up here?

The story of how I ended up here at the University of Mount Union is unlike most of the others. Mount Union was never my first choice. In fact, it was not even an option when I was looking at schools to transfer to from my home of Penang, Malaysia. No offense. You see, Mount … Read more

The story of how I ended up here at the University of Mount Union is unlike most of the others.

Mount Union was never my first choice. In fact, it was not even an option when I was looking at schools to transfer to from my home of Penang, Malaysia. No offense. You see, Mount Union is a small, liberal arts college located in a little city called Alliance in the state of Ohio. That sentence alone was enough to drive away many students where I come from.

The problem is that, in Malaysia (and most Asian societies), we put too much emphasis on the name or brand of the school. We also think too much about the city and where it is at. Truth is, it doesn’t really matter.

It was already my sophomore year in college when I was searching for an American institution to transfer to. I studied in a program that allows us to take general education courses and then transfer to an American college to complete our education. The names that came up while I was looking for colleges were all big state institutions; names like the University of Kansas, West Virginia University and Ohio’s very own Ohio State University to name a few.

Eventually, after spending months sending out applications (and my horrible transcript), I had finally decided upon a school. I would have friends there, which was always going to be a good thing, but it was also a very big school that has a solid reputation. I was going to KU.

With my flights booked for Lawrence, Kansas, I had everything set and was excited to finally start my American college life. I had all my commitments in my hometown dealt with, and goodbyes prepared. But what I didn’t know was that two years later, I would not be in Kansas.

A couple of months before I was scheduled to leave, a recruit from an unknown college called University of Mount Union came to my home state of Penang. He had connections there. Being a small state, my parents happened to know the parents of an alumnus. Through their connections, the recruit and my parents met. I was not there to talk to him. After the discussion, it was agreed that I would give it a shot and apply for Mount Union. With little time left, it was uncertain as to whether I would even get accepted or if so, get it done in time.

I heard back from Mount Union a couple of weeks later and a pretty good offer was placed at my table. It was a difficult decision to make. I had my KU acceptance letter sitting in front of me while the offer from Mount Union sat next to it. Going to KU meant going to a big college and experiencing what we normally see on TV. Going to KU also meant that I had my friends from home there with me. Mount Union, being a small college in an unknown city, was a huge uncertainty that I wasn’t sure I was willing to gamble on.

Inevitably I had to make a decision. Mount Union was going to be more affordable than KU, but what it offered was way more than just financial. Mount Union would have smaller class sizes; no bigger than any class I have been in while I was still home. Mount Union was always going to have a better and more inclusive environment.

My flights to Kansas were changed. Canton-Akron Regional Airport was my new destination.

Here I am, two years later, blogging for the college that I had never heard of before; being a proud Purple Raider. I had the opportunity to play a season of soccer for the junior varsity team and train with the tennis team. Oh, not forgetting the fact that I was elected president for the Association of International Students.

Funny how things take a totally different course and change your life forever.

International Hour: Ghana

International Hour: Ghana

The Association of International Students (AIS) has a radio program called International Hour. The show airs on Mount Union’s very own WRMU 91.1FM every Thursday night at 9 p.m. On the previous segment of the AIS International Hour, I visited the West African nation of Ghana. For a very long time, Mount Union lacked representatives … Read more


The Association of International Students (AIS) has a radio program called International Hour. The show airs on Mount Union’s very own WRMU 91.1FM every Thursday night at 9 p.m.

On the previous segment of the AIS International Hour, I visited the West African nation of Ghana. For a very long time, Mount Union lacked representatives from the African continent. We never really had students from Africa come to Mount Union (transfer or exchange). This year, we have students representing Ethiopia, Senegal (later moved to France) and, of course, Ghana.

International Hour: Ghana was a first. I have repeated a few countries before; covering different aspects of the country each time the country had a repeat feature on the show. International Hour: Ghana came after I featured Ethiopia the week prior. I am getting side-tracked.

International Hour: Ghana was an interesting show to prepare for. It made me realize that the English language is more commonly used for Ghanaian songs compared to their local languages and dialects. Why? Because English is their official language (former British colony) and it was easier to market with English.

Here are some of the facts about Ghana:

Capital City: Accra

Population: approximately 25 milion

Size comparison: slightly smaller than Oregon

Official language: English (due to British colonization)

Neighbors: Ivory Coast (west), Burkina Faso (north, and Togo (east). Gulf of Guinea in the south.

My guest for the show was Edward, or commonly known as Eddie among the international students. He is a new transfer student from Ghana. He lived in the capital city, Accra. Eddie is currently a freshman and will be at Mount for the whole nine yards (or whole four years).

Eddie said that one of the hardest things for him to get used to when he first came to America was the weather. The climate in Ghana is only classified into two seasons; dry and wet. Not getting snow in Ghana, Eddie had a hard time getting used to the bitter cold and the endless snow that we had earlier in the year.

His favorite thing about America is the friendliness of the people. Though I had pointed out that it could just be a “mid-west thing,” Eddie stated that even in New York, where he had his connecting flight, people were generally friendlier.

The term “Ghanaian” can be a very general term used to describe the people of Ghana. There are various ethnic groups in Ghana; Akan, Ewe and Guan to name a few. The people of Ghana differs from region to region. They speak different languages passed down from their ancestors as well as different dialects within those languages. Ghana, in this aspect, is very diverse.

English is the uniting language of the nation as it is the official language of Ghana. Children are taught in schools while most classes (except foreign languages) are conducted in English. Students in Ghana can also learn French. Eddie told me during the show that French was an option offered by the Ghanaian government because their neighboring countries all speak French.

The mainstream media in Ghana is basically influenced by American media. Besides having their local artistes, American pop music has a huge presence in modern day Ghana. The same goes for movies and television. Most of the movies shown in Ghana are made in Hollywood. Most of the TV shows are, obviously, American TV shows. It seems to be a pattern in many countries. The taking over of the mainstream media by the American media in many countries is a very common phenomenon.

Here is a song by Ghanaian hip-hop artiste, Fuse ODG, from the show: watch?v=6LCoksSQMzs

Ghana Flag

Be sure to tune in to the International Hour every Thursday night at 9 on WRMU 91.1FM!

International Hour on WRMU

International Hour on WRMU

Traveling has always been one of my passions. I love visiting new places and learning new things, culture, language and FOOD. Studying here in Ohio is essentially an entirely new experience for me. Well, not as new as it was two years ago, but you get the point. Being atMount Union gave me opportunities that … Read more

International Hour Traveling has always been one of my passions. I love visiting new places and learning new things, culture, language and FOOD.

Studying here in Ohio is essentially an entirely new experience for me. Well, not as new as it was two years ago, but you get the point.

Being atMount Union gave me opportunities that I could never imagine having if I had went to a larger school. Since my transfer from my little island state of Penang in Malaysia, I had been able to have first hand experience with creating ad campaigns, operating film studio equipment, being a president for an association representing my peers from around the world and now, I even have my own radio show.

It’s called “International Hour.” Essentially what goes down in my show is each week, I focus on one country; highlighting certain aspects of its culture, like language, beliefs, music and the occasional stereotypes. Songs from the country of the week will be played throughout the hour-long radio program. The songs are selected by guests from the particular country, who join me in the WRMU studio to share their experience in the United States as well as the differences between the culture of their native country and the US.

So far, I have covered countries like China, Japan, South Korea, Ethiopia, Northern Ireland, Germany, Georgia, France and Spain to name a few.

The things I’ve learned from doing this show are endless. Each week, I learn a little more about a different part of the world. Each week, I discover new songs and styles of music.

I will be recapping each country featured on the show starting this week.

The International Hour is a radio program by the Association of International Students. The show is on Mount Union’s very own WRMU 91.1, every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST.

So, what country will be featured next?

The Year of the Snake

The Year of the Snake

Happy New Year! Chinese New Year, that is! To be politically correct, and avoid being bombarded with corrections, Happy Lunar New Year. CNY/LNY is a huge holiday for many international students on campus. It marks the beginning of a new lunar calendar year. This year, may the year of the Snake bring prosperity. Here are … Read more

Happy Year of the Snake!

Happy New Year! Chinese New Year, that is!

To be politically correct, and avoid being bombarded with corrections, Happy Lunar New Year. CNY/LNY is a huge holiday for many international students on campus. It marks the beginning of a new lunar calendar year. This year, may the year of the Snake bring prosperity.

Here are some CNY/LNY customs and facts:

1. The celebration lasts for 15 days.

2. Sweeping is a taboo on the eve of the CNY/LNY. It is said to sweep out the good luck for the year.

3. The first words uttered during the new year will determine person’s fortunes for the entire year. So watch what you say!

4. Legend says that Buddha invited all the animals to join him during the new year but only 12 turned up. He then named a year after each of the 12 animals. The lunar calendar has 12 zodiacs. I was born on the year of the Goat.

5. People wear RED to bring prosperity. Dark colors are avoided.

6. Red envelopes with money are handed out from married people to children. The custom varies from place to place, but the red envelopes remain.

This is my third Chinese New Year away from home. I left home to come to Mount Union in January 2011 before the celebrations began and I have not returned for the celebrations since. It seems strange because I have not done much during the new year since I came here. This year, I decided do things my way. Traditionally, my family hosts a series of steamboat (hotpot to some) dinners where many people, family and friends, will come over to eat and catch up. This time around, I hosted my own. With the help of my fellow Malaysians on campus, we managed to pull off a dinner that matched my family dinners. Well, besides the fact that the guest list was totally different. After the dinner, I celebrated and welcomed the new year the same way many college students here celebrate any occasion: Party! I invited a few friends over and it meant a lot to me that I could share the biggest holiday in my culture with friends I have made here at Mount Union.

The celebrations are not over just yet. After all, I did tell you that our new year celebration lasts for 15 days. So, anyone want to celebrate it with me?

Skiing/Snowboarding? Sure!

Skiing/Snowboarding? Sure!

At the beginning of this spring 2013 semester, the Association of International Students (AIS) took some of its members to a nearby ski resort in northeast Ohio to put all that snow we’ve been getting to good use. A total of 16 international students went on this trip. Snow Trails in Mansfield was the destination. … Read more

Some of the AIS members at Snow Trails in Mansfield, OH.

At the beginning of this spring 2013 semester, the Association of International Students (AIS) took some of its members to a nearby ski resort in northeast Ohio to put all that snow we’ve been getting to good use.

A total of 16 international students went on this trip. Snow Trails in Mansfield was the destination.

Some of the students who went on this ski trip were relatively skilled; coming from European nations or from Japan, where snow and skiing is a common thing. Coming from tropical Malaysia, I was a little less prepared.

I think the smartest thing to do for a first-timer at a ski resort is to take up skiing. I decided to be a little less smart and took up snowboarding instead.

It was amazing!

It always looked so easy when you see people doing it in movies. It looked effortless when I watched the Winter X-Games on TV the night before. But let me be the first to admit that Shawn White made me think snowboarding was too easy. That did not help me when I had to do the actual thing. So I fell. I fell once, twice and maybe thirty times. All that in my first hour of snowboarding, mind you.

After about five hours of falling, with some snowboarding, I was aching all around.

This trip was just one of the many things that the AIS does to take the students away from their daily routines and escape into a different world. One of the goals of AIS is to take the international students, as well as any American students who wish to join, out for different activities. We all know the value of a getaway from the stress of school and work.

Diversify for the future.

Throughout the Martin Luther King, Jr. Week, I have been helping out here and there with some of the events. The Tunnel of Oppression really hit home as we were preparing for it. I looked up all the incidents that has happened over the past 3 years in my home of Malaysia and it was … Read more

Throughout the Martin Luther King, Jr. Week, I have been helping out here and there with some of the events. The Tunnel of Oppression really hit home as we were preparing for it. I looked up all the incidents that has happened over the past 3 years in my home of Malaysia and it was really hard to swallow.

On Tuesday, January 22, presidents of the diversity organizations presented their dreams for diversity. The presentation was held in T&H 100. I took a different approach as to what I wanted to say. As president of the Association of International Students, it was hard to try compressing the issues of the entire world into a short 5-7 minute presentation/speech.

Here’s a slightly modified version of my speech. A UMU Blog exclusive? I say yes.

International students on campus provide a unique cultural exchange. It helps students who have not experienced other cultures to be more aware of the world outside their borders.

I come from Malaysia’s island state of Penang, where 1.5 million people coexist in a state that’s only 1/5 the size of Delaware. Malaysians, just like most Americans, were immigrants; though my country has a much shorter timeline than that of the United States. I grew up alongside my peers, coming from different ethnic backgrounds and religions. We have Chinese people speaking an Indian dialect and Indians speaking a Chinese dialect, sometimes better than a Chinese, like myself.

What I’m trying to say is that I know what it’s like to live in a very diverse community.

But this is not about me.

Today we live in a world where people from many different places find themselves in a common environment. People are travelling more these days whether it’s for work, for travel, or like all of us, for school. Demographics are changing and the advancement of modern technology also makes the world much smaller than it used to be.

We as the Association of International Students think that in a perfect world, people will be judged by their character and not by their heritage or the color of their skin.

Martin Luther King, Jr. said that “Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

Nothing is more dangerous than when one indulges in his foolishness and prides on his kind while mocking that of others; when one knowingly refuses to know and discriminates people for being unfamiliar. Discrimination of any kind is a result of sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.

Cultures have collided for a long time now. This is no new phenomenon. Unfortunately, pride and ignorance plagues the world. I can understand. It is much easier to just sit back and rest on what you know rather than putting yourself in an unfamiliar situation with unfamiliar people.

We are still a work in progress. We are not yet the world Martin Luther King, Jr. had envisioned when he took a stand; when he decided to speak for those who had no voice. We are still being identified by our race, religion or which part of the world we came from. Why?

Does it really matter? Other than our passports, is it necessary to have our nationalities stated? On IDs, is it necessary to have our race and religion stated when all we really need are our names, age and gender? Does it matter if someone is a Chinese Muslim, a Caucasian Christian, a Latino Jew or an African Buddhist? The answer is no. I am not less friendly to my peers in the Diversity Council because of their culture, ethnicity or religion. I am also not any friendlier to someone from my side of the world just because they look similar to me.

We are not one collective being. Asians, for example, are not all good at math. I remember in my first semester here, I caught the guy next to me trying to cheat off my paper in our calculus exam. Well he certainly picked the wrong Asian to cheat off now, didn’t he? Cause I suck at math. By assuming what my abilities are because of my skin color, he probably didn’t do too well on that exam.

Jokes aside, we cannot let ignorance continue to block progress. Whether we like it or not, the world is changing; becoming more mixed every single day. We cannot choose to not know and expect the world to just conform into one monotonous being. While many things can be universalized, like which side of the road we should drive on or what measuring system we should use, many things, important things, cannot and should not.

We should embrace diversity, appreciating the spectrum that makes the world colorful, instead of expecting the world to be just one way or hate it because it’s another. Our heritage, our culture, things like that are what’s important for us to know where we came from and understand how we got here, but it should not be the defining part about us. We need to see people for who they are and not what they are. To move forward, we need to stand firm on who we are, but also allow others the same privilege.

What do you think?

We are Asians… but we are NOT the same.

“NI HAO!” “KONICHIWA!” While it is cool that one can say hello in the language of the two most obvious Asian nations, it is not cool when you say it to someone who isn’t from either nations. I get that a lot. From cars passing by, people that walk by on the streets, even students … Read more

“NI HAO!”

“KONICHIWA!”

While it is cool that one can say hello in the language of the two most obvious Asian nations, it is not cool when you say it to someone who isn’t from either nations. I get that a lot. From cars passing by, people that walk by on the streets, even students on campus. I get it. I come from a relatively unknown country in South East Asia. But it really isn’t being smart if you just scream out one of the two greetings above to someone just because they look, how should I put this… oriental?

Bear with me here. For this is not a rant. I want to enlighten people.

Asia is the largest and most populous continent on the planet. It has a total of 48 countries and also home to about 4 billion people; 60% of the world’s population (give or take). But the most amazing part about Asia is that it has over 2,000 spoken languages. Yes, you read correctly, TWO THOUSAND.

Nearly every Asian nation has it’s own language, making it difficult to communicate among each other. That’s why we use English as the common ground. China alone has over 200 different dialects and India has over a 100. It is a crazy world over there in Asia. Even in Malaysia, being multiracial, we speak different languages. Malays, the majority race, speaks Malay. Indian-Malaysians speak Tamil, one of the Indian dialects. The tribes in Malaysia all have their own languages. Chinese-Malaysians, my people, speak at least three Chinese dialects in Malaysia. In Penang where I am from, we mostly speak Hokkien (Fujian in China) dialect. In other states, the Chinese speak Mandarin. Others speak Cantonese. I can speak in all three dialects, for the most part.

Crossing any border in Asia is like walking into an entirely different world. Asia is so diverse in culture, history and language that it makes it virtually impossible to group us under one umbrella. The fact that we are categorized as “Asians” is also not accurate. How do you group over 4 billion people into one little category? We are guilty of doing that to ourselves too.

Generally, when one mentions “Asian,” the image that will probably appear in your head is an image of a Chinese or Japanese man. Admit it, you are doing that right now.

The point I’m trying to make here is clear. Do not let ignorance make you look like someone who is insensitive. Surely it would seem ignorant if a foreigner came to America and screamed “HOWDY PARTNER” at every American? The same applies to Asians.

Fact of the matter is that we are all really different people. Asians are not all alike. And to be honest, not all Asians get along either.

So the next time you see someone who is of Asian heritage, refrain from screaming “NI HAO” or “KONICHIWA.” Instead, really get to know where they come from before trying something like that. Who knows? You might even learn a new way of saying “Hello” in a new Asian language. Now THAT would be cool.

Frat Parties: Unlike the Movies

You have all seen the typical college/high school movie. The ones where jocks rule and the weird kids get pushed around. The ones where there are endless parties at fraternities and freshmen get hazed in order to get into one of the fraternities. It’s a lie. By now, those of you who have read my … Read more

You have all seen the typical college/high school movie. The ones where jocks rule and the weird kids get pushed around. The ones where there are endless parties at fraternities and freshmen get hazed in order to get into one of the fraternities.

It’s a lie.

By now, those of you who have read my blog posts will know that I am a transfer student from Malaysia and I have been here since January 2011. I have never been to a frat party over the past four semesters. It was always something I had chosen to avoid because, sorry to say, I’m not a big fan of that culture. And by “that culture” I mean fraternities and sororities.

Nevertheless, I have always had that image in my head. The idea that frat parties are always insane and out of control. The idea that all frat boys do is party day and night. Can you blame me? The amount of movies that depict this exact scenario is insane!

This semester, I decided to put aside all my prejudice and give it a go. I wanted to be a more open person. I thought that if I were to be accepted by American students for my diversity, I should also give their culture a chance. So I did. I went to a frat party. No, I went to two.

The first was a month or so ago at Phi Kappa Tau. I was genuinely excited. It was going to be the first time I stepped foot in a fraternity and the first time I attended a frat party. It was by far the strangest experience I have ever had. The party was unlike anything I had seen in the movies before. It was bizarre and a little appalling. What I saw there, I could never UN-see.

Then on Friday night, I had decided to give it another go; thinking that I might have just went to one of those bad ones. So I went to the Sigma Nu “Saints and Sinners” party. My initial concern was that I had no idea how to dress for the theme. But as soon as I stepped into the party, I knew that all my concerns were for nothing. That was because no one actually dressed like the theme suggested. It was, in every aspect, “just another frat party.” This time, I did not stick around. I left. Very rapidly.

I guess coming from Malaysia, I had a different idea of how frat parties were supposed to be. In many ways, I was disappointed. Everything that I had seen in movies were just fictional scenarios made up by screenwriters to over-exaggerate the actual thing. But I suppose I was also relieved that I did not like it. I am now safe from the possible frat party addiction.

I was not impressed, guys. Most of us international students expected more from all the movies we have seen about frat parties here in America. But no worries, maybe it’s just because I myself have had little experience with parties back in my hometown over the last summer. Maybe.