Author Archives: Kaitlin Jeffreys

About Kaitlin Jeffreys

My name is Kaitlin and I am a junior at Mount Union. I am majoring in Psychology and minoring in both Intervention Specialist and Sociology. In my free time here at Mount I am a part of Alpha Phi Omega (a co-ed service fraternity), Delta Sigma Tau, and the Relay for Life Planning Committee.

Mixing Up Some Fun

Mixing Up Some Fun

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All the movies portray college as one big beer fest; frat parties, sorority parties and just plain old parties are the objects of the media most times. Aside from this being a completely inaccurate portrayal of college life, especially here at Mount Union, we as a campus work harder towards the mature management of alcohol instead of hosting the best parties in the United States (like some other schools in Ohio).

GAMMA is a major organization on campus that works toward this common goal. Their acronym stands for Greeks Advocating the Mature Management of Alcohol, which means that members are from the sororities and fraternities on campus, but their influence extends beyond the Greek community. This organization puts on a variety of events throughout the year that do just what their name implies, advocate mature management of alcohol.

One of these events, and arguably one of the largest, is a mocktail competition. This competition took place this past Wednesday and drew quite a crowd. Any organization on campus is encouraged to create a mocktail and compete. The goal is, in the end, to show that alcohol isn’t needed to have a good time and enjoy beverages that are varied and pretty tasty. This year there were a large number of mocktails created, tasted, judged and voted upon. There were trophies awarded for most members in attendance and people’s choice and prizes were awarded for first, second and third place. The group that won most members in attendance was Delta Sigma Tau. The picture to the right is just a few of sisters of DST with their mocktail.

I, along with a friend, headed up the mocktail concoction for Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed service fraternity that I spoke about in my last blog. Our drink was based around Breast Cancer Awareness since it’s October (Breast Cancer Awareness Month). APO decided to make a drink to advocate for this cause because of the sheer amount of cases of breast cancer being diagnosed each day, each month and each year. Did you know that a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer every three minutes? That means, in the time since you began this blog, a woman has been given a diagnosis that will change her life forever. Wow. That’s crazy to think about. THAT’S why there is a whole month dedicated to education about this cancer and THAT’S why APO chose this cause.

The drink we chose to make is called the “Pink Boobie Saver.” It may be a funny name, but people did come over to look and raised awareness on our campus.

Here’s the recipe in case you want to join in on the wholesome, non-alcoholic fun!
2 parts white grape juice
2 parts cranberry juice
1 part frozen pink lemonade
1 part sparkling water
Ice

High School Senioritis

High School Senioritis

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My Facebook news feed has begun to show me what time of year it is for those who I’m friends with who are seniors in high school… it’s the beginnings of senioritis. A lot of seniors are already receiving their acceptance letters from their desired future schools, and those who haven’t are probably done with taking the ACT or SAT. They know where they want to go, have probably sent some applications out and the rest are over caring about school. Now they just want to send out their college applications, so they too can join the crowd of their peers who JUST.DON’T.CARE. … it’s a bad decision to take this route. I repeat… this is a bade decision! Senioritis is the enemy of every senior, everywhere, every year. Remember: colleges CAN and DO occasionally revoke acceptance to students who’s GPAs plummet their senior year of high school.

Let me just tell you about my senior year of high school. I was always a pretty good student. I worked hard in classes and slacked off occasionally (like almost all high school students do), but the moment I received my acceptance letter from not only Mount Union, but 3 other schools I applied to, I hit a wall. I had been taking AP classes and was in AP English when the acceptance letters arrived. I dropped that class faster than I could even open all the envelopes of acceptance. Bad choice. I ended up picking up another class that gave some college credit, but if I would’ve kept with AP, I could’ve had 18 college credit hours going into college. How cool would that have been?! Instead I came in with only six and ended up having to take an English class here.

Here’s my suggestion: fight it! Fight that senioritis as hard as you can because your last year of high school DOES matter. Even if you can’t wait to get out of your small town, take on the big world, live on your own… the things that happen before you make it really do matter a lot. Never forget that while college will become the best years of your life, high school is a precursor to that.

Internships… Do ‘em!

Internships… Do ‘em!

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Walking through the Hoover-Price Campus Center (HPCC) sometime in September my freshman year I noticed there were a lot of tables set-up outside the cafeteria and noticed it was a job and internship fair. It didn’t really interest me too much and I was really pretty excited it was nacho bar day at lunch and I wanted to keep my eye on the prize, but ya know what pulled me in? Free pens. I can directly link the best experience of my life thus far to my obsession with deals. What experience is that you ask? No it wasn’t the free pen as I’m sure I lost that the same day. Coming upon the table for autism internships was the most beautiful coincidence of my life. A free pen, a table, an information sheet, an online application and a short email later… I had an interview. And, soon after that, I had an offer to take one of the summer classroom intern positions at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Autism (CCCA).

The CCCA summer internship program was set up due in large part to the work of Dr. Turko of the Department of Psychology and is made up of three separate internships – classroom, research and social spies. Both the classroom and research internships take place at the center in Shaker Heights. The research interns collect and record data for center-wide research. Social spies work as camp counselors at one of two camps for typical kids that kids with Asperger disorder attend and work on their social skills without being separated from their peers. These interns are assigned to one or two campers and help them with anything they need.

The classroom internship, I obviously know a bit more about, since I was able to take part in it. These interns basically are given the opportunity, in most cases, to be taking on a role as a cognitive behavioral therapist (CBT), which are easily described as teachers. Each intern is put in one classroom and he or she stay there for the two months of the internship. As an intern in Intermediate 1B, which is students from about 11 to 16 years old, I worked with getting materials ready for the day, recording behavior data, implementing behavior plans, implemented curriculum/working one-on-one or one-on-two with students. It is impossible to describe how amazing an experience it is without experiencing it for yourself, so I urge anyone with an interest to at least apply… this year, next year or three years down the road, just do it sometime. Since the summer after my freshman year (2010), I have been able to volunteer there intermittently. I completed one semester of placement for an education class there, volunteered two days a week last summer and will volunteer one day a week next semester to fulfill my psychology internship requirement. I have made professional connections that will be indispensable in the future and hope that the CCCA will be a future place of employment.

Even if you’re not interested for this coming summer’s program, get familiar with it so you can apply in the future. Below is a flier, much like the one I picked up that fateful day in HPCC, so you can look it over and get to know the program!

New Kid on the Block

New Kid on the Block

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Hello! My name is Kaitlin Jeffreys and I’d like to introduce myself so you can get to know who’s helping you get to know the world of Mount Union! Before we get to where I am now, let’s start with from where I’m from.

I’m from Amherst, a pretty small city (about half the size of Alliance) just west of Cleveland. I’ve lived there my entire life and if you ask my mom, she’ll tell you that I’ll live there the rest of my life (which may or may not be true). It’s as close to Utopia as I’ve ever found. My family is a major part of my life. My brother is in the Air Force, so it’s just my mom, dad and me, and it has been that way for quite a few years now. In high school … well, all throughout my life for that matter, I was a swimmer. I lived, breathed, ate and drank swimming. If you had told me that I would go to college and NOT continue to swim, I would’ve told you that you were crazy.

I came to Mount Union on a rainy fall day during my junior year because I was looking at the swim team. Instead of falling for swimming, as I had planned, I fell for the beauty of this campus. The way it made me feel was like I’d lived here for years, but it was the first time I had set foot on the campus. I was weak in the knees for Chapman Hall. I was left fluttering over the quad and my heart beat faster when I first glanced at the Campus Lakes. Since then, my relationship with the campus has only grown.

Now, a little bit about myself and my life at this beautiful place… I’m a psychology major and have minors in intervention specialist (which I know, doesn’t sound like proper English, but it is) and sociology. I actually just switched most of that around last year as I previously was majoring in intervention specialist (special education) and had just one minor in psychology. I realized having a psychology degree would open up more doors into the field I actually want to pursue. Off of that, you should know that I have a deep passion for working with individuals with autism. I had an internship at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Autism the summer after my freshman year and my interest has continued to grow. I’ll talk more about that in a future blog, so stay tuned.

I’m also involved in a few organizations on campus. Alpha Phi Omega (which we call APO) was my first love when I came here. APO is a co-ed service fraternity that offers wonderful opportunities to serve the campus, community and even wider areas. I’m also a member of Delta Sigma Tau, one of the sororities on campus, and have found yet another family. The final major thing I do, aside from going to class of course, is help with planning Relay for Life on campus. I served on the planning committee as the team development co-chair. I’m sure there will be a blog in the future about this too!

I think that’s it for me. I hope that you will come back and read again in the future and get to know me better. I’ll be writing about a wide range of things that hopefully you will find interesting!